Current Members

Lab Director

Dr. Margaret Sheridan

Margaret Sheridan, Ph.D. received her degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007. After completing her clinical internship at NYU Child Study Center/Bellevue Hospital, she spent three years as a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard School of Public Health and then as an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. In 2015 she left HMS to become an Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and serve as the director of the CIRCLE Lab (http://circlelab.unc.edu/). The goal of her research is to better understand the neural underpinnings of the development of cognitive control across childhood (from 5-18 years of age) and to understand how and why disruption in this process results in psychopathology. She approaches this problem in two ways.  First, by studying atypical development, in particular children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  Second, by studying the effect of experience on brain development, specifically, the effect of adversity on prefrontal cortex function in childhood.  The CIRCLE Lab is focused on using rigorous and novel task design and cutting edge analytic approaches to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to solve real world problems such as better diagnosing ADHD or creating safer, healthier environments for children growing up in poverty.

Dr. Margaret Sheridan

Margaret Sheridan, Ph.D. received her degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007. After completing her clinical internship at NYU Child Study Center/Bellevue Hospital, she spent three years as a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at Harvard School of Public Health and then as an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. In 2015 she left HMS to become an Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and serve as the director of the CIRCLE Lab (http://circlelab.unc.edu/). The goal of her research is to better understand the neural underpinnings of the development of cognitive control across childhood (from 5-18 years of age) and to understand how and why disruption in this process results in psychopathology. She approaches this problem in two ways.  First, by studying atypical development, in particular children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  Second, by studying the effect of experience on brain development, specifically, the effect of adversity on prefrontal cortex function in childhood.  The CIRCLE Lab is focused on using rigorous and novel task design and cutting edge analytic approaches to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to solve real world problems such as better diagnosing ADHD or creating safer, healthier environments for children growing up in poverty.

Co-investigators

Dr. Adam Bryant Miller

Adam Bryant Miller, PhD, received his degree in clinical psychology from George Mason University in 2015. After completing his predoctoral clinical internship at the University of Washington, School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital, Dr. Miller completed an NRSA F32 postdoctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Miller is now a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neurosciences at UNC where he is the director of the Miller Lab. Dr. Miller’s program of research focuses on the neurobiology of adolescent health risk behaviors with a particular emphasis on adolescent self-injurious thoughts and behaviors. Visit the Miller Lab here.

Dr. Adam Bryant Miller

Adam Bryant Miller, PhD, received his degree in clinical psychology from George Mason University in 2015. After completing his predoctoral clinical internship at the University of Washington, School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital, Dr. Miller completed an NRSA F32 postdoctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Miller is now a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neurosciences at UNC where he is the director of the Miller Lab. Dr. Miller’s program of research focuses on the neurobiology of adolescent health risk behaviors with a particular emphasis on adolescent self-injurious thoughts and behaviors. Visit the Miller Lab here.

Post-Docs

Dr. Helen Milojevich

Helen Milojevich graduated from the University of California, Davis with a BS in Human Development and from the University of California, Irvine with her PhD in Psychology and Social Behavior. Dr. Milojevich’s program of research is focused on understanding factors related to risk and resiliency in the face of early exposure to adversity and challenges, particularly the roles of parents and the family environment more broadly. Specifically Dr. Milojevich’s work seeks to understand how emotional competence and cognition develop from early childhood through adolescence in high-risk populations (e.g., maltreated children and children with developmental delays). Using a multi-method and multi-informant approach, Helen seeks to address such questions as: when and how do maltreated youth differ from non-maltreated youth in their emotional competence? How do maltreating parents socialize emotional (in)competence in their children over time? To what extent do children with Down syndrome differ from typically developing children in their ability to retain and generalize information over the long-term? What interventions can be implemented at home, school, and in treatment programs to facilitate the healthy development of high-risk children?

Dr. Helen Milojevich

Helen Milojevich graduated from the University of California, Davis with a BS in Human Development and from the University of California, Irvine with her PhD in Psychology and Social Behavior. Dr. Milojevich’s program of research is focused on understanding factors related to risk and resiliency in the face of early exposure to adversity and challenges, particularly the roles of parents and the family environment more broadly. Specifically Dr. Milojevich’s work seeks to understand how emotional competence and cognition develop from early childhood through adolescence in high-risk populations (e.g., maltreated children and children with developmental delays). Using a multi-method and multi-informant approach, Helen seeks to address such questions as: when and how do maltreated youth differ from non-maltreated youth in their emotional competence? How do maltreating parents socialize emotional (in)competence in their children over time? To what extent do children with Down syndrome differ from typically developing children in their ability to retain and generalize information over the long-term? What interventions can be implemented at home, school, and in treatment programs to facilitate the healthy development of high-risk children?

Dr. Maria Jimena Sarmiento-B

María Jimena Sarmiento-B., Ph.D. received her degree in Psychology in 2004 in Colombia where she is originally from. She has worked with children with learning disabilities and emotional problems. She completed her Master´s degree in Diagnosis and Neuropsychological rehabilitation at the Autonomous University of Puebla in Mexico (2009), focusing on children with acquired brain damage as a traumatic brain injury (TBI). After her Ph.D., Maria worked as Assistant Professor of Neuropsychology at the University of San Buenaventura Bogotá and Research at Institute for Educational Research and Pedagogical Development (IDEP). In 2013, she traveled to Brazil and enrolled in a Ph.D. program in Education with emphasis in Cognition, Development and Learning, obtaining her degree in 2018. The main focus of Dr. Sarmiento's research is the impact of different meditation techniques on empathy development. Now as a part of the CIRCLE Lab, she is integrating her experience as a Neuropsychologist and expertise in child development with the Wellness Health And Life Experiences Study (WHALE).

Dr. Maria Jimena Sarmiento-B

María Jimena Sarmiento-B., Ph.D. received her degree in Psychology in 2004 in Colombia where she is originally from. She has worked with children with learning disabilities and emotional problems. She completed her Master´s degree in Diagnosis and Neuropsychological rehabilitation at the Autonomous University of Puebla in Mexico (2009), focusing on children with acquired brain damage as a traumatic brain injury (TBI). After her Ph.D., Maria worked as Assistant Professor of Neuropsychology at the University of San Buenaventura Bogotá and Research at Institute for Educational Research and Pedagogical Development (IDEP). In 2013, she traveled to Brazil and enrolled in a Ph.D. program in Education with emphasis in Cognition, Development and Learning, obtaining her degree in 2018. The main focus of Dr. Sarmiento's research is the impact of different meditation techniques on empathy development. Now as a part of the CIRCLE Lab, she is integrating her experience as a Neuropsychologist and expertise in child development with the Wellness Health And Life Experiences Study (WHALE).

Graduate Students

Anais Rodriguez-Thompson

Anais is a second-year graduate student in UNC's clinical psychology program working with mentor Dr. Margaret Sheridan. She received her B.A. in psychology from Columbia University in 2015. After graduating, she worked in Dr. Joshua Roffman's Brain Genomics Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital, linking folate-related genes and exposure to neural markers for schizophrenia risk. As a graduate student, she aims to study functional networks associated with emotional regulation and dysregulation in adolescents, with an eye towards how self-awareness may impact these networks. 

Anais Rodriguez-Thompson

Anais is a second-year graduate student in UNC's clinical psychology program working with mentor Dr. Margaret Sheridan. She received her B.A. in psychology from Columbia University in 2015. After graduating, she worked in Dr. Joshua Roffman's Brain Genomics Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital, linking folate-related genes and exposure to neural markers for schizophrenia risk. As a graduate student, she aims to study functional networks associated with emotional regulation and dysregulation in adolescents, with an eye towards how self-awareness may impact these networks. 

Kristin Meyer

Kristin is a fourth-year graduate student in UNC’s Clinical and Cognitive Psychology joint-doctoral program working with advisors Dr. Margaret Sheridan and Dr. Joe Hopfinger. She received a B.S. degree in psychology from Birmingham-Southern College in 2013. After graduating, Kristin became an AmeriCorps volunteer working with at-risk elementary school students and later worked as a research technician involved with behavioral health projects at UAB’s HIV Clinic. She is currently pursuing her interests regarding the cognitive and neural components underlying executive function development in typical and atypical populations. Kiki is a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) recipient! Kiki has participated in UNC Haven Training.

Kristin Meyer

Kristin is a fourth-year graduate student in UNC’s Clinical and Cognitive Psychology joint-doctoral program working with advisors Dr. Margaret Sheridan and Dr. Joe Hopfinger. She received a B.S. degree in psychology from Birmingham-Southern College in 2013. After graduating, Kristin became an AmeriCorps volunteer working with at-risk elementary school students and later worked as a research technician involved with behavioral health projects at UAB’s HIV Clinic. She is currently pursuing her interests regarding the cognitive and neural components underlying executive function development in typical and atypical populations. Kiki is a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) recipient! Kiki has participated in UNC Haven Training.

Laura Machlin

Laura is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program at UNC under the mentorship of Dr. Margaret Sheridan. She received her BA in Psychology and Science in Society from Wesleyan University in 2013. Following graduation, she was a post-bac IRTA at the NIH under the mentorship of Dr. Ellen Leibenluft investigating predictors of internalizing disorders in children and the neural correlates of irritability across diagnoses. Her research focuses on how deprivation and threatening experiences in early childhood differentially impact neural development. Laura is a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) recipient! Laura has participated in UNC Haven Training and Safe Zone training.

Laura Machlin

Laura is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program at UNC under the mentorship of Dr. Margaret Sheridan. She received her BA in Psychology and Science in Society from Wesleyan University in 2013. Following graduation, she was a post-bac IRTA at the NIH under the mentorship of Dr. Ellen Leibenluft investigating predictors of internalizing disorders in children and the neural correlates of irritability across diagnoses. Her research focuses on how deprivation and threatening experiences in early childhood differentially impact neural development. Laura is a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) recipient! Laura has participated in UNC Haven Training and Safe Zone training.

Sarah Furlong

Sarah Furlong is a third-year graduate student working with Dr. Margaret Sheridan in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program in the UNC department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She earned her B.A. in Cognitive Science with a minor in Psychology at Johns Hopkins University in 2014. After graduation, Sarah worked as the lab manager for Dr. Elissa L. Newport at the Georgetown University Learning and Development Lab in the Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery. Sarah studies the development and flexibility of functional brain networks and the diagnosis and treatment of developmental disorders, particularly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in early childhood. To read more about Sarah's research, please visit sarahfurlong.weebly.com.

Sarah Furlong

Sarah Furlong is a third-year graduate student working with Dr. Margaret Sheridan in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program in the UNC department of Psychology and Neuroscience. She earned her B.A. in Cognitive Science with a minor in Psychology at Johns Hopkins University in 2014. After graduation, Sarah worked as the lab manager for Dr. Elissa L. Newport at the Georgetown University Learning and Development Lab in the Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery. Sarah studies the development and flexibility of functional brain networks and the diagnosis and treatment of developmental disorders, particularly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in early childhood. To read more about Sarah's research, please visit sarahfurlong.weebly.com.

Madeline Robertson

Madeline is a second year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology and Behavioral & Integrative Neuroscience programs working under the mentorship of Drs. Margaret Sheridan and Charlotte Boettiger. Before coming to UNC, Madeline obtained a BS in Neuroscience from the University of New Hampshire, and a MS in Neurobiology from Northwestern University. After graduating, Madeline joined the Sensorimotor Integration Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital where she investigated the neural correlates of behavioral dysfunction to aid in the development of a novel approach to treating neuropsychiatric disorders with closed-loop deep brain stimulation. At UNC, Madeline aims to utilize behavioral testing, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and non-invasive brain stimulation to study the role of frontal lobe connectivity in governing behavioral flexibility in individuals exposed to adolescent binge drinking and forms of early adverse experience.

Madeline Robertson

Madeline is a second year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology and Behavioral & Integrative Neuroscience programs working under the mentorship of Drs. Margaret Sheridan and Charlotte Boettiger. Before coming to UNC, Madeline obtained a BS in Neuroscience from the University of New Hampshire, and a MS in Neurobiology from Northwestern University. After graduating, Madeline joined the Sensorimotor Integration Laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital where she investigated the neural correlates of behavioral dysfunction to aid in the development of a novel approach to treating neuropsychiatric disorders with closed-loop deep brain stimulation. At UNC, Madeline aims to utilize behavioral testing, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and non-invasive brain stimulation to study the role of frontal lobe connectivity in governing behavioral flexibility in individuals exposed to adolescent binge drinking and forms of early adverse experience.

Research Assistants

Adrienne Bonar

Adrienne earned her B.A. from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she studied Psychology and Women’s & Gender Studies. She will be working as a full-time research assistant under Dr. Margaret Sheridan and Dr. Adam Miller. Her primary role will be coordinating the Youth Emotion Study, a neuroimaging study that examines how adverse life experiences affect brain development through adolescence. She hopes to continue studying the links between emotion dysregulation and psychopathology at the doctoral level

Adrienne Bonar

Adrienne earned her B.A. from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she studied Psychology and Women’s & Gender Studies. She will be working as a full-time research assistant under Dr. Margaret Sheridan and Dr. Adam Miller. Her primary role will be coordinating the Youth Emotion Study, a neuroimaging study that examines how adverse life experiences affect brain development through adolescence. She hopes to continue studying the links between emotion dysregulation and psychopathology at the doctoral level

Ebony Leon

Ebony D. Leon is the CIRCLE Lab Manager and research assistant on the 'whale' project. Ebony began her journey in research as an undergraduate scholar in the NIH-funded, IMSD program at North Carolina State University, where she primarily studied parental socialization and socioemotional development. She then went on to earn her M.S. in Human Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she focused on child and youth development across sociocultural contexts. Ebony is excited to be back in the Research Triangle, and working in the CIRCLE Lab. Specifically, she is interested in understanding the neurological processes associated with children’s socioemotional development and resilience, and how these processes play out across the lifespan, especially for those who have experienced trauma/adversity.

Ebony Leon

Ebony D. Leon is the CIRCLE Lab Manager and research assistant on the 'whale' project. Ebony began her journey in research as an undergraduate scholar in the NIH-funded, IMSD program at North Carolina State University, where she primarily studied parental socialization and socioemotional development. She then went on to earn her M.S. in Human Development at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she focused on child and youth development across sociocultural contexts. Ebony is excited to be back in the Research Triangle, and working in the CIRCLE Lab. Specifically, she is interested in understanding the neurological processes associated with children’s socioemotional development and resilience, and how these processes play out across the lifespan, especially for those who have experienced trauma/adversity.

Toni Howell

A research assistant in the CIRCLE lab, Toni graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B.A. in Biology and Psychology and a minor in Neuroscience. As an undergraduate research assistant at UNC-CH, Toni worked in the Emotions and Social Interactions in Relationships lab in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and in the Center for Decision Research lab at the Kenan-Flagler Business School. After graduation, she worked as a Clinical Research Specialist, Sr. at the Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development exploring biomarkers of autism. Toni is interested in how adversity and trauma impact the brain, the neurobiology of resilience, and how early experiences impact the epigenome. Outside of research, Toni enjoys hiking, reading, and spending time with her pets.

Toni Howell

A research assistant in the CIRCLE lab, Toni graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B.A. in Biology and Psychology and a minor in Neuroscience. As an undergraduate research assistant at UNC-CH, Toni worked in the Emotions and Social Interactions in Relationships lab in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and in the Center for Decision Research lab at the Kenan-Flagler Business School. After graduation, she worked as a Clinical Research Specialist, Sr. at the Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development exploring biomarkers of autism. Toni is interested in how adversity and trauma impact the brain, the neurobiology of resilience, and how early experiences impact the epigenome. Outside of research, Toni enjoys hiking, reading, and spending time with her pets.

Amanda Mitchell

Amanda is a full-time research assistant on the WHALE Study under Dr. Margaret Sheridan. She graduated from Columbia University in the City of New York with a B.A. in Biology and a minor in Ethnicity & Race Studies. As an undergraduate, she worked for three years in clinical research in Columbia University Medical Center's NeuroICU researching both the influence of coagulopathy on hematoma expansion and the impact of intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages on cognition, emotion, and lifestyle. Amanda is interested in exploring the development of socioemotional intelligence and personality in children, as well as how the impact of adversity on childhood psychological development can have far-reaching ramifications on adult health and wellness.

Amanda Mitchell

Amanda is a full-time research assistant on the WHALE Study under Dr. Margaret Sheridan. She graduated from Columbia University in the City of New York with a B.A. in Biology and a minor in Ethnicity & Race Studies. As an undergraduate, she worked for three years in clinical research in Columbia University Medical Center's NeuroICU researching both the influence of coagulopathy on hematoma expansion and the impact of intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages on cognition, emotion, and lifestyle. Amanda is interested in exploring the development of socioemotional intelligence and personality in children, as well as how the impact of adversity on childhood psychological development can have far-reaching ramifications on adult health and wellness.

Undergraduate Research Assistants

Abby Grace Lewis

Abby is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a psychology major double minoring in chemistry and neuroscience and is planning on pursuing a career as a Psychiatrist.

Abby Grace Lewis

Abby is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a psychology major double minoring in chemistry and neuroscience and is planning on pursuing a career as a Psychiatrist.

Alexa Kate Sterling

Alexa Sterling is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill double majoring in Psychology and Sociology with a minor in Women's and Gender Studies. She is interested in the neuroscience of child development and is excited to gain experience with the CIRCLE lab. After graduating, she hopes to continue research and begin her phD in developmental psychology.

Alexa Kate Sterling

Alexa Sterling is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill double majoring in Psychology and Sociology with a minor in Women's and Gender Studies. She is interested in the neuroscience of child development and is excited to gain experience with the CIRCLE lab. After graduating, she hopes to continue research and begin her phD in developmental psychology.

Allison Rebecca Naude

Allie is a sophomore at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and Spanish. She is excited to gain undergraduate research experience in the CIRCLE Lab, and she is especially interested in studying the effects of substance use on the adolescent brain. After college, she hopes to continue doing research and attend medical school.

Allison Rebecca Naude

Allie is a sophomore at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and Spanish. She is excited to gain undergraduate research experience in the CIRCLE Lab, and she is especially interested in studying the effects of substance use on the adolescent brain. After college, she hopes to continue doing research and attend medical school.

Angela Rosimo Velasco

Angela is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and minoring in Neuroscience. Angela is excited to learn more about the process of research and further understand the complexity of the brain and the unique experiences that influences its development. She hopes to one day continue doing research and attend graduate school.

Angela Rosimo Velasco

Angela is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and minoring in Neuroscience. Angela is excited to learn more about the process of research and further understand the complexity of the brain and the unique experiences that influences its development. She hopes to one day continue doing research and attend graduate school.

Carolina Duque Echeverry

Carolina is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology. She is interested in understanding neural processes associated with emotion and how they differ among individuals of varying backgrounds in connection to race, culture and early life experiences. In the future, Carolina hopes to continue doing research and later pursue graduate studies.

Carolina Duque Echeverry

Carolina is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology. She is interested in understanding neural processes associated with emotion and how they differ among individuals of varying backgrounds in connection to race, culture and early life experiences. In the future, Carolina hopes to continue doing research and later pursue graduate studies.

Cheyenne Bricken

Cheyenne recently graduated from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B.S. in Biology and minors in Chemistry and Spanish. She is a research assistant on the Multi-visit Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging (MAP) Study, a neuroimaging study that examines how individual trajectories of early brain development from infancy predict cognitive and behavioral outcomes later in childhood. She is particularly interested in relating their cognitive outcomes to their longitudinal brain trajectories.

Cheyenne Bricken

Cheyenne recently graduated from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B.S. in Biology and minors in Chemistry and Spanish. She is a research assistant on the Multi-visit Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging (MAP) Study, a neuroimaging study that examines how individual trajectories of early brain development from infancy predict cognitive and behavioral outcomes later in childhood. She is particularly interested in relating their cognitive outcomes to their longitudinal brain trajectories.

Clara Xu

Clara Xu is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in Psychology and Computer Science. She is interested in learning more about the relationship between brain structure and behaviors. She also loves to learn more about the roles of computations and algorithms in studying cognition. Outside of school, Clara enjoys cooking, painting, and listening to music.

Clara Xu

Clara Xu is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in Psychology and Computer Science. She is interested in learning more about the relationship between brain structure and behaviors. She also loves to learn more about the roles of computations and algorithms in studying cognition. Outside of school, Clara enjoys cooking, painting, and listening to music.

Deepak Haresh Melwani

Deepak Melwani is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in Biology with minors in Chemistry and Neuroscience. As a member of the CIRCLE Lab, he is excited to gain experience with neuroimaging while learning about brain development and structure. After graduating, he plans to attend medical school and continue pursuing research. Outside of school, Deepak enjoys cooking, hiking, running, and watching movies.

Deepak Haresh Melwani

Deepak Melwani is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in Biology with minors in Chemistry and Neuroscience. As a member of the CIRCLE Lab, he is excited to gain experience with neuroimaging while learning about brain development and structure. After graduating, he plans to attend medical school and continue pursuing research. Outside of school, Deepak enjoys cooking, hiking, running, and watching movies.

Diane Erin Youngstrom

Diane is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Neuroscience and Chemistry.  Diane is interested in using neuroimaging as an avenue to investigate and attempt to understand the complexity of the human brain. She hopes to continue doing research and pursue graduate school. Outside of school, Diane enjoys photography, traveling, music, hiking, and laughing with family and friends on her latest adventures.

Diane Erin Youngstrom

Diane is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Neuroscience and Chemistry.  Diane is interested in using neuroimaging as an avenue to investigate and attempt to understand the complexity of the human brain. She hopes to continue doing research and pursue graduate school. Outside of school, Diane enjoys photography, traveling, music, hiking, and laughing with family and friends on her latest adventures.

Drew Tyler Huffman

Drew is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and Chemistry. He's especially interested in learning about how the structures and functions of different brain areas change over the course of a person's life due to experience. In his free time he enjoys reading, playing tennis, and listening to podcasts. After earning his undergraduate degree he hopes to attend medical school.

Drew Tyler Huffman

Drew is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and Chemistry. He's especially interested in learning about how the structures and functions of different brain areas change over the course of a person's life due to experience. In his free time he enjoys reading, playing tennis, and listening to podcasts. After earning his undergraduate degree he hopes to attend medical school.

Elizabeth Diane Wilson

Elizabeth is a junior at UNC double majoring in Human Development and Family Studies and Psychology. Elizabeth is interested in posttraumatic stress as well as other social and behavioral aspects impacting young children and adolescents that may contribute to adverse behaviors in adulthood. In the future, she hopes to complete a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a focus on child and family therapy.
 

Elizabeth Diane Wilson

Elizabeth is a junior at UNC double majoring in Human Development and Family Studies and Psychology. Elizabeth is interested in posttraumatic stress as well as other social and behavioral aspects impacting young children and adolescents that may contribute to adverse behaviors in adulthood. In the future, she hopes to complete a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a focus on child and family therapy.
 

Gregory Andrew Rinn

Gregory is a junior at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Exercise and Sports Science. He is excited to gain valuable experience in undergraduate research as a member of the CIRCLE Lab, and is interested in learning more about brain development and how life experiences have an impact on brain function. After college, he hopes to continue doing research and attend medical school.

Gregory Andrew Rinn

Gregory is a junior at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Exercise and Sports Science. He is excited to gain valuable experience in undergraduate research as a member of the CIRCLE Lab, and is interested in learning more about brain development and how life experiences have an impact on brain function. After college, he hopes to continue doing research and attend medical school.

Heidi Kreis

Heidi Kreis is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, double majoring in Psychology and Exercise and Sports Science. Heidi hopes to gain experience with research in psychology, with a specific interest in pediatric cognitive and behavioral patterns. After completing her undergraduate degree, Heidi plans to attend graduate school in an Occupational Therapy program.

Heidi Kreis

Heidi Kreis is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, double majoring in Psychology and Exercise and Sports Science. Heidi hopes to gain experience with research in psychology, with a specific interest in pediatric cognitive and behavioral patterns. After completing her undergraduate degree, Heidi plans to attend graduate school in an Occupational Therapy program.

Kaitlin Demarco

Kaitlin is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in Neuroscience and pursuing minors in Chemistry and Business. As a member of CIRCLE Lab, she is excited to gain experience with neuroscience research and learn more about cognition and brain development in children. After graduation, she hopes to attend physical or occupational therapy school. 

Kaitlin Demarco

Kaitlin is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in Neuroscience and pursuing minors in Chemistry and Business. As a member of CIRCLE Lab, she is excited to gain experience with neuroscience research and learn more about cognition and brain development in children. After graduation, she hopes to attend physical or occupational therapy school. 

Kelsey Sutton

Kelsey is a senior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill double majoring in Psychology and Sociology with a minor in Southern studies. As a member of the CIRCLE Lab, she is excited to learn more about neuroimaging and adolescent brain development. Kelsey is also interested in mood disorders in adolescents with a focus on social context and evidence-based treatment. She also works as a research assistant in Dr. Prinstein’s Peer Relations Lab. After graduation, Kelsey plans to continue research and later pursue a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

Kelsey Sutton

Kelsey is a senior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill double majoring in Psychology and Sociology with a minor in Southern studies. As a member of the CIRCLE Lab, she is excited to learn more about neuroimaging and adolescent brain development. Kelsey is also interested in mood disorders in adolescents with a focus on social context and evidence-based treatment. She also works as a research assistant in Dr. Prinstein’s Peer Relations Lab. After graduation, Kelsey plans to continue research and later pursue a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

Kinjal Patel

Kinjal Patel is a current senior at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and Exercise and Sports Science. As a member of CIRCLE Lab, she is excited to gain experience with psychological research methods and learn more about cognition and brain development in children. In the future, Kinjal hopes to continue doing research and eventually attend graduate school. 

Kinjal Patel

Kinjal Patel is a current senior at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill studying Psychology and Exercise and Sports Science. As a member of CIRCLE Lab, she is excited to gain experience with psychological research methods and learn more about cognition and brain development in children. In the future, Kinjal hopes to continue doing research and eventually attend graduate school. 

Lexi Baird

Lexi is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in both Neuroscience and Film Studies. She has a special interest in the neural processes of perception and is excited to gain experience with neuroimaging technology. After graduation, Lexi plans to continue working in research prior to attending Optometry school. Outside of her studies, she enjoys working as a freelance photographer, DJing at WXYC and collecting vinyl records.

Lexi Baird

Lexi is a junior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill majoring in both Neuroscience and Film Studies. She has a special interest in the neural processes of perception and is excited to gain experience with neuroimaging technology. After graduation, Lexi plans to continue working in research prior to attending Optometry school. Outside of her studies, she enjoys working as a freelance photographer, DJing at WXYC and collecting vinyl records.

Olivia Kathryn Mihulka

Olivia is a junior at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . She is pursuing a major in Neuroscience and minors in Biology and Chemistry. She is interested in using neuroimaging to study brain development and is excited to gain experience as a member of the CIRCLE Lab. After graduating, Olivia hopes to continue conducting research and to attend medical school.

Olivia Kathryn Mihulka

Olivia is a junior at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . She is pursuing a major in Neuroscience and minors in Biology and Chemistry. She is interested in using neuroimaging to study brain development and is excited to gain experience as a member of the CIRCLE Lab. After graduating, Olivia hopes to continue conducting research and to attend medical school.

Taylor Walicki

Taylor is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She’s currently a double major in statistics and analytics and psychology and is pursuing a minor in computer science. She is especially interested in the quantitative side of psychology research and hopes to learn more about the research process and research methodologies. In the future, she hopes to attend graduate school in quantitative psychology.

Taylor Walicki

Taylor is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She’s currently a double major in statistics and analytics and psychology and is pursuing a minor in computer science. She is especially interested in the quantitative side of psychology research and hopes to learn more about the research process and research methodologies. In the future, she hopes to attend graduate school in quantitative psychology.

Vivienne Knul

Vivienne is a sophomore at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pursuing a major in Psychology and minor in Neuroscience. Viv is interested in studying children’s cognitive development and learning, and the influences of internal and external factors on child development. After graduation, she hopes to attend graduate school in a clinical psychology program or optometry school and specialize in pediatric vision therapy.

Vivienne Knul

Vivienne is a sophomore at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pursuing a major in Psychology and minor in Neuroscience. Viv is interested in studying children’s cognitive development and learning, and the influences of internal and external factors on child development. After graduation, she hopes to attend graduate school in a clinical psychology program or optometry school and specialize in pediatric vision therapy.